There are two safes in the RPD--one in the West Office and the other in the Waiting Room. Both yield valuable resources well worth grabbing. We won't spoil what's inside each here (spoiler: they're all useful items), but we will reveal how to open them. The safe solutions are found in memos scattered around the building, which we've detailed the locations of for all of you completionists out there.

Wilderness Exchange is within walking distance of Union and they require you leave a bag with them when you go into the store, they may be willing to stash your bag for a few hours. No guarantee on that, but an option if you can't find anything else. They are only open 10am-6pm on Sundays, so you may have to wait around a bit or pick it up early depending on when you get there and will be leaving.
Perforated lockers are similar to the standard types of locker, but the door and walls are made largely or entirely of perforated steel, with hundreds of holes creating a strong mesh arranged in a diagonal pattern. This is used where good ventilation is required, or where, for security reasons, it is necessary that the contents can be examined visually while the doors are locked.
Don't count on finding this kind of thing. Some silly people put bombs in there. Our Homeland Security people try to head those things off. In Europe, especially GB, you can't even find a trash can on the sidewalks for the same reason. A worker at the train station told us to just throw it on the floor, the people in the green jackets will pick it up. Really. What a world we live in.
Some schools in the United States have been reported to have abolished the use of lockers. Security concerns are cited as the reason for this, with the concern being that lockers may be used to store contraband items such as weapons or drugs or pornographic material.[1] There has been some controversy over in what circumstances school authorities or law-enforcement officials are permitted to search lockers, with or without informing the users, or with or without the users being present at the time of the search, and it has been considered a civil liberties issue, particularly in the U.S.
Tiers: may be specified as single-tier (full height), two-tier, three-tier, etc., meaning that the lockers are stacked on top of each other in layers two high, three high, etc. Tiers are commonly up to eight high; on occasion, even more tiers may be found, in the case of very small lockers for such purposes as storing laptop computers. The most common numbers of tiers found in lockers are, in order, one, two, and four; three-tier lockers are rather less common, and other numbers such as five, six, or eight even less common still - seven almost non-existent. Since locker cabinets are most commonly 6 feet (182.9 cm.) high (although there are exceptions), the height of individual lockers varies according to how many tiers are accommodated within the cabinet. The height of individual lockers is usually approximately 6 feet (182.9 cm.) divided by the number of tiers, so that two-tier lockers are about 3 feet (91.4 cm.) high, three-tier lockers 2 feet (61 cm.) high, four-tier lockers 1.5 feet (45.7 cm.) high, and so on. Standard features often vary according to the number of tiers: single-tier lockers usually include a shelf about a foot (roughly 30 cm.) from the top, and a hanging rail (sometimes with one or two hooks) immediately underneath that, at the top of the large compartment beneath the shelf; two- or three-tier lockers usually lack the shelf, but include the hanging rail; lockers with four or more tiers usually have none of these fittings, but consist of just the bare compartment.

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