With the same standard features as the Traditional line, the Traditional Plus Collection is intended for more rugged applications and has matching finish on all sides and top for a finished look. Phenolic Lockers are the material of choice when a high degree of design flexibility is desired or where durability and strength are required. These lockers are fabricated to stand the test of time. The dense components, combined with stainless steel brackets and fasteners, stand up to the most extreme conditions of moisture and humidity. Phenolic is impact, water and corrosion resistant, and does not support bacteria.
Quality Refurbishing Many of the old, wholesale lockers we have in stock have minimal damage and some are near brand-new condition. For lockers that need repairs, our unique multiple point inspection and repair process helps to refine these lockers to a high quality, salvaged state. We know you want to buy quality lockers and we will not be shipping out lockers that are not fully functional. To get the most out of your refurbished locker, we also offer tips on alternative ways you can utilize them. Don't want to have the same old wall locker look? Use one as a laundry room locker or a console table.
Public lockers are available on all floors of the Anderson Academic Commons for short-term storage needs.  Lockers are available on a first-come, first-served basis.  To use a locker, enter a 4-digit personalized code for locking and unlocking.  Directions for setting the 4-digit code are located inside each locker.  Lockers unlock automatically after 24 hours.
The visually appealing and very durable Traditional Collection is our most widely distributed locker line. Offering the most value for typical locker applications, this collection is available in a full range of spacious sizes, from single- to six-tier configurations, as well as two-person, 16-person and wall-mounted. The addition of our new 2 person Z-Locker completes the Traditional collection. Denver Lockers Click Here
This film roll is interesting in that it doesn't point you to the location of resources; rather, it points you to an item you can use to gain some valuable stuff. Located in the Safety Deposit Room, grab the film roll by keying in the proper code to unlock the locker its sealed in. Though, you're by no means required to develop the film roll to get the items its photograph hints towards, but it does help direct you towards what you need to do
Lockers are usually physically joined together side by side in banks, and are commonly made from steel, although wood, laminate, and plastic are other materials sometimes found. Steel lockers which are banked together share side walls, and are constructed by starting with a complete locker; further lockers may then be adding by constructing the floor, roof, rear wall, door, and just one extra side wall, the existing side wall of the previous locker serving as the other side wall of the new one. The walls, floors, and roof of lockers may be either riveted together (the more traditional method) or, more recently, welded together.
Examine the scepter to obtain the Red Jewel. This goes into the Bejeweled Box, which you can get in the Interrogation Room. Accessing this area requires the Club Key, so if you don't have that yet, keep progressing the story until you get it. Once you've got the Bejeweled Box, combine it with the Red Jewel to get the S.T.A.R.S. badge. You can use this item in two locations: the Underground Stairs in the Middle section of the Underground Facility, and the S.T.A.R.S. Office.
Locking options: various types of key locking or padlocking facility are available now. Key locking options include flush locks, cam locks, or locks incorporated into a rotating handle; padlocking facilities may be a simple hasp and staple, or else a padlocking hole may be included in a handle, often called a latchlock. More modern designs include keyless operation, either by coin deposit (which may or may not be returned when use of the locker terminates), or by using electronic keypads to enter passwords for later reopening the locker. Some older lockers used a drop-latch which was incorporated into the door handle, and slid up and down and could be padlocked at the bottom in the "down" position, but these are less used now. Three-point locking is not possible with this type of latch, because it needs to be operated by means of a latch that rotates rather than slides up and down; so this drop-latch is probably a less secure locking option, which may be why it is little used nowadays. Prefect Combination locks are very popular in school lockers used in the UK due to their ease of use and the time and cost saved in the removal of locker keys. 

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Locking options: various types of key locking or padlocking facility are available now. Key locking options include flush locks, cam locks, or locks incorporated into a rotating handle; padlocking facilities may be a simple hasp and staple, or else a padlocking hole may be included in a handle, often called a latchlock. More modern designs include keyless operation, either by coin deposit (which may or may not be returned when use of the locker terminates), or by using electronic keypads to enter passwords for later reopening the locker. Some older lockers used a drop-latch which was incorporated into the door handle, and slid up and down and could be padlocked at the bottom in the "down" position, but these are less used now. Three-point locking is not possible with this type of latch, because it needs to be operated by means of a latch that rotates rather than slides up and down; so this drop-latch is probably a less secure locking option, which may be why it is little used nowadays. Prefect Combination locks are very popular in school lockers used in the UK due to their ease of use and the time and cost saved in the removal of locker keys.
Lockers are usually physically joined together side by side in banks, and are commonly made from steel, although wood, laminate, and plastic are other materials sometimes found. Steel lockers which are banked together share side walls, and are constructed by starting with a complete locker; further lockers may then be adding by constructing the floor, roof, rear wall, door, and just one extra side wall, the existing side wall of the previous locker serving as the other side wall of the new one. The walls, floors, and roof of lockers may be either riveted together (the more traditional method) or, more recently, welded together.
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Denver Lockers

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