The rental of the lockers and these Terms & Conditions are governed under and by the laws of the State of Washington. The parties consent and agree that the exclusive jurisdiction and venue for any dispute or claim relating to the rental and/or use of the lockers and/or locker facility, whether in contract, tort, or any other area of the law, shall be in Seattle, Washington.
Accessing and using the lockers and facilities provided is your consent and acceptance of ALL of the terms and conditions concerning the facilities, lockers and supplied lock and combination. The terms and condition include those set forth below and all rules, hours of use and other terms and conditions posted at the facility or in conjunction with the event.
Don't count on finding this kind of thing. Some silly people put bombs in there. Our Homeland Security people try to head those things off. In Europe, especially GB, you can't even find a trash can on the sidewalks for the same reason. A worker at the train station told us to just throw it on the floor, the people in the green jackets will pick it up. Really. What a world we live in.
Lockers are usually physically joined together side by side in banks, and are commonly made from steel, although wood, laminate, and plastic are other materials sometimes found. Steel lockers which are banked together share side walls, and are constructed by starting with a complete locker; further lockers may then be adding by constructing the floor, roof, rear wall, door, and just one extra side wall, the existing side wall of the previous locker serving as the other side wall of the new one. The walls, floors, and roof of lockers may be either riveted together (the more traditional method) or, more recently, welded together.
They are usually intended for use in public places, and intended for the short- or long-term private use of individuals for storing clothing or other personal items. Users may rent a locker for a single use or for a period of time for repeated use. Some lockers are offered as a free service to people partaking of certain activities that require the safekeeping of personal items.
Terry, there are many storage unit places closer to the airport, but then of course you'd have to rent a car. DIA Self Storage, for example, is less than 10 miles away. You can google map Denver International Airport, then "search nearby" for "self storage units" if you think that's something you might want to do. http://www.coloradoselfstorage.com/

LOCKERS ARE USED AT RENTER’S OWN RISK. THE OPERATOR (INCLUDING EMPLOYEES, AGENTS, AND/OR CONTRACTORS OF THE OPERATOR, THE EVENT AND THE VENUE) DISCLAIMS ANY AND ALL LIABILITY FOR ANY ITEMS STORED WITHIN THE LOCKERS OR THE LOCKER FACILITY, INCLUDING LOSSES RESULTING FROM LOCK FAILURE, RIOTS, VANDALISM, WEATHER, LOCKER ACCESSED BY OTHERS, COMBINATION ACCESSED BY OTHERS, THEFT, OR FAILURE TO COLLECT THE ARTICLES AFTER USE.
Terry, there are many storage unit places closer to the airport, but then of course you'd have to rent a car. DIA Self Storage, for example, is less than 10 miles away. You can google map Denver International Airport, then "search nearby" for "self storage units" if you think that's something you might want to do. http://www.coloradoselfstorage.com/
Tiers: may be specified as single-tier (full height), two-tier, three-tier, etc., meaning that the lockers are stacked on top of each other in layers two high, three high, etc. Tiers are commonly up to eight high; on occasion, even more tiers may be found, in the case of very small lockers for such purposes as storing laptop computers. The most common numbers of tiers found in lockers are, in order, one, two, and four; three-tier lockers are rather less common, and other numbers such as five, six, or eight even less common still - seven almost non-existent. Since locker cabinets are most commonly 6 feet (182.9 cm.) high (although there are exceptions), the height of individual lockers varies according to how many tiers are accommodated within the cabinet. The height of individual lockers is usually approximately 6 feet (182.9 cm.) divided by the number of tiers, so that two-tier lockers are about 3 feet (91.4 cm.) high, three-tier lockers 2 feet (61 cm.) high, four-tier lockers 1.5 feet (45.7 cm.) high, and so on. Standard features often vary according to the number of tiers: single-tier lockers usually include a shelf about a foot (roughly 30 cm.) from the top, and a hanging rail (sometimes with one or two hooks) immediately underneath that, at the top of the large compartment beneath the shelf; two- or three-tier lockers usually lack the shelf, but include the hanging rail; lockers with four or more tiers usually have none of these fittings, but consist of just the bare compartment.

The storage lockers were a “pilot,” the kind of small test that city government frequently uses to test a new or controversial idea. The city offered up the lockers for individuals to use for months-long stretches. At the time, city officials warned that “misuse of the lockers, vandalism, or other unanticipated results,” could force them to cancel the project.

Locker

×