Dimensions (Note that, in English-speaking countries, even those commonly using metric measurements now, locker dimensions are usually clean numbers of inches or feet, while the corresponding metric measurements are uneven, involving decimal places when precision is required, presumably resulting from continued use of locker designs based on feet and inches, unchanged for decades other than for cosmetic features.):

Sloping tops: while most lockers have flat tops, some manufacturers offer the option of sloping tops to their range of lockers. The slope may be of either 30 degrees or 45 degrees to the horizontal, sloping towards the front, and the purpose of this is to make it impossible to store items on top of the lockers, or to make it harder for dust or other debris to accumulate there. This is an important factor in places like food-processing factories or restaurants where hygiene requirements must be met.

With the same standard features as the Traditional line, the Traditional Plus Collection is intended for more rugged applications and has matching finish on all sides and top for a finished look. Phenolic Lockers are the material of choice when a high degree of design flexibility is desired or where durability and strength are required. These lockers are fabricated to stand the test of time. The dense components, combined with stainless steel brackets and fasteners, stand up to the most extreme conditions of moisture and humidity. Phenolic is impact, water and corrosion resistant, and does not support bacteria.


Teaming up with the Saint Francis Center, Denver is also planning on adding 200 more storage spaces at the organization’s employment service center, located near the city’s capital building. The contract between the city of Denver and the Saint Francis Center will start on June 1 and with $130,000 for the first year of storage space. After that, the center will be given $100,000 a year if the contract continues.
Number of locking points: Locker doors may lock with either single- or three-point locking, but this is not normally chosen as a separate option, and the choice is usually dependent on the number of tiers in the lockers, or whether they are a high-security model, although some manufacturers do allow purchasers to specifically choose an option here that goes against their normal practice. Single-point locking locks the door at only the point where the latch engages with the door-frame, whereas three-point locking uses extensible steel rods to lock the top and bottom of the door as well.
The storage lockers were a “pilot,” the kind of small test that city government frequently uses to test a new or controversial idea. The city offered up the lockers for individuals to use for months-long stretches. At the time, city officials warned that “misuse of the lockers, vandalism, or other unanticipated results,” could force them to cancel the project.

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