Stored my luggage for several hours at Lugden. Great location just across the street from Union Station. Spoke with the owner and he said he owns the parking spot so they are always there during the day. Prices were reasonable and I felt comfortable storing my bags there while I explored Denver. The owner was nice and gave me coupons for some local businesses.
At Shelving Rack & Lockers, Inc. we are always doing our part to recycle good industrial storage equipment. We are continually looking for quality used products that are in usable and sturdy condition. Doing so allows us to give you great products as well as incredible savings. Additionally, it helps us do our part to keep unnecessary items out of our landfills, making our environment more green.

Salsbury Industries carries a complete line of metal lockers that are designed for heavy duty use and storage. Metal lockers are constructed of 16 gauge steel and are available in single tier, double tier, triple tier, six tier box style, box style bridge, extra wide single tier, extra wide double tier and extra wide triple tier lockers. Metal lockers are available as Standard Metal Lockers, Extra Wide Standard Metal Lockers, Vented Metal Lockers, Extra Wide Vented Metal Lockers and in a variety of additional products.

Tiers: may be specified as single-tier (full height), two-tier, three-tier, etc., meaning that the lockers are stacked on top of each other in layers two high, three high, etc. Tiers are commonly up to eight high; on occasion, even more tiers may be found, in the case of very small lockers for such purposes as storing laptop computers. The most common numbers of tiers found in lockers are, in order, one, two, and four; three-tier lockers are rather less common, and other numbers such as five, six, or eight even less common still - seven almost non-existent. Since locker cabinets are most commonly 6 feet (182.9 cm.) high (although there are exceptions), the height of individual lockers varies according to how many tiers are accommodated within the cabinet. The height of individual lockers is usually approximately 6 feet (182.9 cm.) divided by the number of tiers, so that two-tier lockers are about 3 feet (91.4 cm.) high, three-tier lockers 2 feet (61 cm.) high, four-tier lockers 1.5 feet (45.7 cm.) high, and so on. Standard features often vary according to the number of tiers: single-tier lockers usually include a shelf about a foot (roughly 30 cm.) from the top, and a hanging rail (sometimes with one or two hooks) immediately underneath that, at the top of the large compartment beneath the shelf; two- or three-tier lockers usually lack the shelf, but include the hanging rail; lockers with four or more tiers usually have none of these fittings, but consist of just the bare compartment.


3-Tier Locker compartments measure 19 in. high and 3-Tier Locker compartments measure 19 in. high and include two side hooks and number plates. Doors have top and bottom louvers for air ventilation. Recessed handle with finger-lift latch accommodates a standard padlock (not included). Welded steel construction with powder coat finish available in 17 colors. Overall size of locker ...  More + Product Details Close

Dimensions (Note that, in English-speaking countries, even those commonly using metric measurements now, locker dimensions are usually clean numbers of inches or feet, while the corresponding metric measurements are uneven, involving decimal places when precision is required, presumably resulting from continued use of locker designs based on feet and inches, unchanged for decades other than for cosmetic features.):

Other advocates of lockerless schools also cite reasons such as reducing noise by eliminating the clang of dozens of locker doors,[1] or creating a more appealing environment aesthetically. It has also been claimed that removing lockers provides good training for students by forcing them to be more efficient in managing their books, and taking the time to plan what books they will need, and carrying only those ones.

Dimensions (Note that, in English-speaking countries, even those commonly using metric measurements now, locker dimensions are usually clean numbers of inches or feet, while the corresponding metric measurements are uneven, involving decimal places when precision is required, presumably resulting from continued use of locker designs based on feet and inches, unchanged for decades other than for cosmetic features.):
“In many cases, they’re [homeless] building things like little shanty towns, bringing furniture in and camping out. There have been incidents at night where there have been brawls or loud arguments happening at 3, 4 a.m. waking people up. I do know that several neighbors have complained that they have found human waste in their yards,” said Romero.
Bicycle lockers are usually in outdoor locations near railway stations and the like where people may want to store bicycles securely. They are often banked together, with individual lockers shaped like an isosceles triangle for efficient and compact storage of a bicycle. This triangular shape permits the lockers to be grouped either in a radial pattern (with the sharpest points of the lockers together), or in a row in alternating orientations.
THE OPERATOR (INCLUDING EMPLOYEES, AGENTS, AND/OR CONTRACTORS OF THE OPERATOR, THE EVENT AND THE VENUE) SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL LOSSES ARISING FROM THE LOSS OF OR INABILITY TO ACCESS ITEMS STORED WITHIN THE LOCKERS AND LOCKER FACILITY, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, MISSED AIRLINE FLIGHTS OR OTHER TRANSPORTATION OR LOSS OF BUSINESS AND SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR LOSS OF PROPERTY DUE TO CUSTOMER’S LOSS OF LOCKER KEYS OR COMBINATIONS.

LOCKERS ARE USED AT RENTER’S OWN RISK. THE OPERATOR (INCLUDING EMPLOYEES, AGENTS, AND/OR CONTRACTORS OF THE OPERATOR, THE EVENT AND THE VENUE) DISCLAIMS ANY AND ALL LIABILITY FOR ANY ITEMS STORED WITHIN THE LOCKERS OR THE LOCKER FACILITY, INCLUDING LOSSES RESULTING FROM LOCK FAILURE, RIOTS, VANDALISM, WEATHER, LOCKER ACCESSED BY OTHERS, COMBINATION ACCESSED BY OTHERS, THEFT, OR FAILURE TO COLLECT THE ARTICLES AFTER USE.

Locking options: various types of key locking or padlocking facility are available now. Key locking options include flush locks, cam locks, or locks incorporated into a rotating handle; padlocking facilities may be a simple hasp and staple, or else a padlocking hole may be included in a handle, often called a latchlock. More modern designs include keyless operation, either by coin deposit (which may or may not be returned when use of the locker terminates), or by using electronic keypads to enter passwords for later reopening the locker. Some older lockers used a drop-latch which was incorporated into the door handle, and slid up and down and could be padlocked at the bottom in the "down" position, but these are less used now. Three-point locking is not possible with this type of latch, because it needs to be operated by means of a latch that rotates rather than slides up and down; so this drop-latch is probably a less secure locking option, which may be why it is little used nowadays. Prefect Combination locks are very popular in school lockers used in the UK due to their ease of use and the time and cost saved in the removal of locker keys.
The storage lockers were a “pilot,” the kind of small test that city government frequently uses to test a new or controversial idea. The city offered up the lockers for individuals to use for months-long stretches. At the time, city officials warned that “misuse of the lockers, vandalism, or other unanticipated results,” could force them to cancel the project. 

Locker

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