THE OPERATOR (INCLUDING EMPLOYEES, AGENTS, AND/OR CONTRACTORS OF THE OPERATOR, THE EVENT AND THE VENUE) SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL LOSSES ARISING FROM THE LOSS OF OR INABILITY TO ACCESS ITEMS STORED WITHIN THE LOCKERS AND LOCKER FACILITY, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, MISSED AIRLINE FLIGHTS OR OTHER TRANSPORTATION OR LOSS OF BUSINESS AND SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR LOSS OF PROPERTY DUE TO CUSTOMER’S LOSS OF LOCKER KEYS OR COMBINATIONS.
Steel thickness: lockers tend to be made from a standard thickness of steel, which is commonly 0.8 mm. thick; but heavy-duty or high-security lockers are offered as a standard option by some manufacturers, or may be available on special order. A typical locker of this sort may be constructed from steel 1.2 mm. thick, for example, and is usually fitted with three-point locking, regardless of the number of tiers.
Some schools in the United States have been reported to have abolished the use of lockers. Security concerns are cited as the reason for this, with the concern being that lockers may be used to store contraband items such as weapons or drugs or pornographic material.[1] There has been some controversy over in what circumstances school authorities or law-enforcement officials are permitted to search lockers, with or without informing the users, or with or without the users being present at the time of the search, and it has been considered a civil liberties issue, particularly in the U.S.
Other advocates of lockerless schools also cite reasons such as reducing noise by eliminating the clang of dozens of locker doors,[1] or creating a more appealing environment aesthetically. It has also been claimed that removing lockers provides good training for students by forcing them to be more efficient in managing their books, and taking the time to plan what books they will need, and carrying only those ones.
Laundry lockers are used in places like hospitals and food-processing workplaces where uniforms have to be collected, laundered, then returned to their owners. The locker cabinet contains a number of very narrow lockers, each of whose doors is keyed using a key held by the owner, so that they have access only to their own locker; but the entire array of doors is embedded in a much larger door covering the entire front of the cabinet. Opening this opens all the lockers simultaneously, and requires the use of a master key which is held by whoever collects items deposited in lockers, for laundering, then returned in the same way, after which they items are accessible to owners using their individual small doors.
3-Tier Locker compartments measure 19 in. high and 3-Tier Locker compartments measure 19 in. high and include two side hooks and number plates. Doors have top and bottom louvers for air ventilation. Recessed handle with finger-lift latch accommodates a standard padlock (not included). Welded steel construction with powder coat finish available in 17 colors. Overall size of locker ...  More + Product Details Close

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