I agree with the suggestion about shipping your skis and boots, especially if you are not going to be using them after the Vail portion of your trip. Are you staying in LA for awhile or just making a connection there? If you are staying at a hotel in LA perhaps you could talk to them about having your equipment shipped there and stored as most hotels do have some sort of luggage storage facility. Hikers on the Appalachian Trail often ship supplies to US post offices that are in towns easily accessible to the trail so they don't have to carry everything with them. A lot will depend on your actual itinerary and whether you are stopping over in LA or just making a connection. You'll likely need to do some research and maybe think outside the box. I know it's always much nicer to ski on equipment you are used to but renting might end up being your best bet and the least hassle.
Division 10 — Specialties Lockers: Division 10 — Specialties is a category within the National Master Specification (NMS) set of guidelines developed by Public Works and Government Services Canada. Division 10 — Specialties items that could be required within a locker room (to meet commercial building and construction regulations) are lockers, washroom accessories, toilet compartments, and toilet partitions. Lockers are constructed of two sides: a back, top and a bottom. Different types of materials are used in locker manufacturing, offering a wide variety of metal lockers, stainless steel lockers, solid plastic lockers, solid phenolic lockers, and custom lockers. A padlock is the most common way to lock a locker; however, you can also use a keyed cylinder lock, built in combination locks or keypad locks. There are a lot of optional extras that can be utilized for lockers, for example: bases, sloping tops, end panels, customized shelves and hooks as well as the locking method (coin-operated lockers are another option). The environment is the best way to distinguish what type of locker will be required for which type of space. For example, if you are putting gym lockers into a humid area, or anywhere close to showers, stainless steel or solid plastic lockers would be most suitable because they are moisture-resistant and rust-resistant. Wood lockers would not be appropriate for this type of environment because the moisture from the humidity would rot the wood.
THE OPERATOR (INCLUDING EMPLOYEES, AGENTS, AND/OR CONTRACTORS OF THE OPERATOR, THE EVENT AND THE VENUE) SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL LOSSES ARISING FROM THE LOSS OF OR INABILITY TO ACCESS ITEMS STORED WITHIN THE LOCKERS AND LOCKER FACILITY, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, MISSED AIRLINE FLIGHTS OR OTHER TRANSPORTATION OR LOSS OF BUSINESS AND SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR LOSS OF PROPERTY DUE TO CUSTOMER’S LOSS OF LOCKER KEYS OR COMBINATIONS.
I agree with the suggestion about shipping your skis and boots, especially if you are not going to be using them after the Vail portion of your trip. Are you staying in LA for awhile or just making a connection there? If you are staying at a hotel in LA perhaps you could talk to them about having your equipment shipped there and stored as most hotels do have some sort of luggage storage facility. Hikers on the Appalachian Trail often ship supplies to US post offices that are in towns easily accessible to the trail so they don't have to carry everything with them. A lot will depend on your actual itinerary and whether you are stopping over in LA or just making a connection. You'll likely need to do some research and maybe think outside the box. I know it's always much nicer to ski on equipment you are used to but renting might end up being your best bet and the least hassle.
The Operator (including employees, agents, and/or contractors of the Operator, the event and the venue) and/or law enforcement officials may inspect any and all items before they are stored in a locker or the facility and may, in their sole discretion, refuse to permit storage any items that may cause a risk and/or nuisance to the Operator, other users, the storage facility, the venue or the event. 

THE OPERATOR (INCLUDING EMPLOYEES, AGENTS, AND/OR CONTRACTORS OF THE OPERATOR, THE EVENT AND THE VENUE) SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL LOSSES ARISING FROM THE LOSS OF OR INABILITY TO ACCESS ITEMS STORED WITHIN THE LOCKERS AND LOCKER FACILITY, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, MISSED AIRLINE FLIGHTS OR OTHER TRANSPORTATION OR LOSS OF BUSINESS AND SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR LOSS OF PROPERTY DUE TO CUSTOMER’S LOSS OF LOCKER KEYS OR COMBINATIONS.

Whether you're playing as Leon or Claire, the solutions remain the same and can be accessed without grabbing the memo that hints at their solution. The only exception to this are the items you grab by developing film rolls--though, there is a minor exception even to that. Regardless, below you can find details on all the optional items locked behind safes, lockers, or hidden in the environment.
Looking for a Lockers, Shelving, Racks business in Denver? AIS Industrial and Construction Supply (Shelving Division) provides Sales, Assembly, Delivery, and Installation of Lockers, Shelving, Racks and Cabinets to Warehouse Storage Solutions – Business Storage Solutions in Arvada, Aurora, Broomfield, Commerce City, Dupont, Eastlake, Englewood, Golden, Henderson, Idledale, Littleton, Westminster, and Wheat Ridge. AIS Industrial and Construction Supply (Shelving Division) have been running their business since 1941.
Some schools in the United States have been reported to have abolished the use of lockers. Security concerns are cited as the reason for this, with the concern being that lockers may be used to store contraband items such as weapons or drugs or pornographic material.[1] There has been some controversy over in what circumstances school authorities or law-enforcement officials are permitted to search lockers, with or without informing the users, or with or without the users being present at the time of the search, and it has been considered a civil liberties issue, particularly in the U.S.
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Memberships are non-refundable, except for medical and health conditions, deployment, or extraneous circumstances. Money is refunded by the same method that payment was made (for instance, if you paid with a Visa card, your refund will be posted to the same Visa card). Please note: there is a six- to eight-week processing period for check refunds. Please contact [email protected] for further questions.

Tiers: may be specified as single-tier (full height), two-tier, three-tier, etc., meaning that the lockers are stacked on top of each other in layers two high, three high, etc. Tiers are commonly up to eight high; on occasion, even more tiers may be found, in the case of very small lockers for such purposes as storing laptop computers. The most common numbers of tiers found in lockers are, in order, one, two, and four; three-tier lockers are rather less common, and other numbers such as five, six, or eight even less common still - seven almost non-existent. Since locker cabinets are most commonly 6 feet (182.9 cm.) high (although there are exceptions), the height of individual lockers varies according to how many tiers are accommodated within the cabinet. The height of individual lockers is usually approximately 6 feet (182.9 cm.) divided by the number of tiers, so that two-tier lockers are about 3 feet (91.4 cm.) high, three-tier lockers 2 feet (61 cm.) high, four-tier lockers 1.5 feet (45.7 cm.) high, and so on. Standard features often vary according to the number of tiers: single-tier lockers usually include a shelf about a foot (roughly 30 cm.) from the top, and a hanging rail (sometimes with one or two hooks) immediately underneath that, at the top of the large compartment beneath the shelf; two- or three-tier lockers usually lack the shelf, but include the hanging rail; lockers with four or more tiers usually have none of these fittings, but consist of just the bare compartment.

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