Court reservations are intended for any of the above sports.  The above sports take priority over other non-intended uses in these courts regardless if a reservation has been made.  Individuals or groups that use these courts for any other activity will be asked to leave the court if others wish to use the court for the above sports.  If courts are unused, then they are allowed to be used for other activities.
3-Tier Locker compartments measure 19 in. high and 3-Tier Locker compartments measure 19 in. high and include two side hooks and number plates. Doors have top and bottom louvers for air ventilation. Recessed handle with finger-lift latch accommodates a standard padlock (not included). Welded steel construction with powder coat finish available in 17 colors. Overall size of locker ...  More + Product Details Close
Don't take chances with a small storage company that doesn't have the nationwide resources like CubeSmart to ensure that customer service is prioritized. We're in it for the long-haul and we recognize that your satisfaction is instrumental to our success. We think you should expect more from storage and our locations in and around Denver are ready to exceed your expectations.
Stepped/2-step lockers are two-tier lockers, usually available only in 15-inch (38-cm.) width; but the compartments and their doors have an L-shaped cross-section, which causes the division between the doors to follow a zigzag pattern. This configuration enables more hanging height to be included in both upper and lower lockers; but part of each compartment (the lower part of the upper one and the upper part of the lower one) will be only half the usual width of two-tier lockers.
Bicycle lockers are usually in outdoor locations near railway stations and the like where people may want to store bicycles securely. They are often banked together, with individual lockers shaped like an isosceles triangle for efficient and compact storage of a bicycle. This triangular shape permits the lockers to be grouped either in a radial pattern (with the sharpest points of the lockers together), or in a row in alternating orientations.
Lockers are usually physically joined together side by side in banks, and are commonly made from steel, although wood, laminate, and plastic are other materials sometimes found. Steel lockers which are banked together share side walls, and are constructed by starting with a complete locker; further lockers may then be adding by constructing the floor, roof, rear wall, door, and just one extra side wall, the existing side wall of the previous locker serving as the other side wall of the new one. The walls, floors, and roof of lockers may be either riveted together (the more traditional method) or, more recently, welded together.
Some schools in the United States have been reported to have abolished the use of lockers. Security concerns are cited as the reason for this, with the concern being that lockers may be used to store contraband items such as weapons or drugs or pornographic material.[1] There has been some controversy over in what circumstances school authorities or law-enforcement officials are permitted to search lockers, with or without informing the users, or with or without the users being present at the time of the search, and it has been considered a civil liberties issue, particularly in the U.S.

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LOCKERS ARE USED AT RENTER’S OWN RISK. THE OPERATOR (INCLUDING EMPLOYEES, AGENTS, AND/OR CONTRACTORS OF THE OPERATOR, THE EVENT AND THE VENUE) DISCLAIMS ANY AND ALL LIABILITY FOR ANY ITEMS STORED WITHIN THE LOCKERS OR THE LOCKER FACILITY, INCLUDING LOSSES RESULTING FROM LOCK FAILURE, RIOTS, VANDALISM, WEATHER, LOCKER ACCESSED BY OTHERS, COMBINATION ACCESSED BY OTHERS, THEFT, OR FAILURE TO COLLECT THE ARTICLES AFTER USE.


If you want lockers, welcome to the place that knows lockers! You will find we are a trusted, family-owned business that has become the largest vendor of lockers in North America and beyond. Here you can find all locker sizes, shapes and colors for schools, businesses and even for homes. Our guests tell us that they came to SchoolLockers.com because we have helped their friends and business associates choose the best lockers for their needs. When you take that wealth of experience plus our convenient and secure online shopping and combine those with the lowest shipping prices possible, you see why we are the locker authority. Give our friendly and knowledgeable staff a call, because we are always available and just a phone call away.


The Operator (including employees, agents, and/or contractors of the Operator, the event and the venue) and/or law enforcement officials may inspect any and all items before they are stored in a locker or the facility and may, in their sole discretion, refuse to permit storage any items that may cause a risk and/or nuisance to the Operator, other users, the storage facility, the venue or the event.
Tiers: may be specified as single-tier (full height), two-tier, three-tier, etc., meaning that the lockers are stacked on top of each other in layers two high, three high, etc. Tiers are commonly up to eight high; on occasion, even more tiers may be found, in the case of very small lockers for such purposes as storing laptop computers. The most common numbers of tiers found in lockers are, in order, one, two, and four; three-tier lockers are rather less common, and other numbers such as five, six, or eight even less common still - seven almost non-existent. Since locker cabinets are most commonly 6 feet (182.9 cm.) high (although there are exceptions), the height of individual lockers varies according to how many tiers are accommodated within the cabinet. The height of individual lockers is usually approximately 6 feet (182.9 cm.) divided by the number of tiers, so that two-tier lockers are about 3 feet (91.4 cm.) high, three-tier lockers 2 feet (61 cm.) high, four-tier lockers 1.5 feet (45.7 cm.) high, and so on. Standard features often vary according to the number of tiers: single-tier lockers usually include a shelf about a foot (roughly 30 cm.) from the top, and a hanging rail (sometimes with one or two hooks) immediately underneath that, at the top of the large compartment beneath the shelf; two- or three-tier lockers usually lack the shelf, but include the hanging rail; lockers with four or more tiers usually have none of these fittings, but consist of just the bare compartment.
They are usually intended for use in public places, and intended for the short- or long-term private use of individuals for storing clothing or other personal items. Users may rent a locker for a single use or for a period of time for repeated use. Some lockers are offered as a free service to people partaking of certain activities that require the safekeeping of personal items.
I agree with the suggestion about shipping your skis and boots, especially if you are not going to be using them after the Vail portion of your trip. Are you staying in LA for awhile or just making a connection there? If you are staying at a hotel in LA perhaps you could talk to them about having your equipment shipped there and stored as most hotels do have some sort of luggage storage facility. Hikers on the Appalachian Trail often ship supplies to US post offices that are in towns easily accessible to the trail so they don't have to carry everything with them. A lot will depend on your actual itinerary and whether you are stopping over in LA or just making a connection. You'll likely need to do some research and maybe think outside the box. I know it's always much nicer to ski on equipment you are used to but renting might end up being your best bet and the least hassle.
Terry, there are many storage unit places closer to the airport, but then of course you'd have to rent a car. DIA Self Storage, for example, is less than 10 miles away. You can google map Denver International Airport, then "search nearby" for "self storage units" if you think that's something you might want to do. http://www.coloradoselfstorage.com/
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