I agree with the suggestion about shipping your skis and boots, especially if you are not going to be using them after the Vail portion of your trip. Are you staying in LA for awhile or just making a connection there? If you are staying at a hotel in LA perhaps you could talk to them about having your equipment shipped there and stored as most hotels do have some sort of luggage storage facility. Hikers on the Appalachian Trail often ship supplies to US post offices that are in towns easily accessible to the trail so they don't have to carry everything with them. A lot will depend on your actual itinerary and whether you are stopping over in LA or just making a connection. You'll likely need to do some research and maybe think outside the box. I know it's always much nicer to ski on equipment you are used to but renting might end up being your best bet and the least hassle.
With traditional package delivery, staff members typically spend a lot of time logging and organizing deliveries. These packages end up taking up valuable floor space and could remain there for a long time if a recipient forgets to pick it up or can't retrieve it during regular office hours. If packages are delivered to the recipient's door, there is the risk of the package being stolen or lost. Most residents would undoubtedly prefer a delivery system with tracking and security measures to keep their items visible at all times even if they're away from home. Lastly, it can be difficult to impossible to store perishable items that need to be refrigerated until the recipient can pick them up. But with meal kit and grocery delivery, this need is only going to increase.
Lockers are usually physically joined together side by side in banks, and are commonly made from steel, although wood, laminate, and plastic are other materials sometimes found. Steel lockers which are banked together share side walls, and are constructed by starting with a complete locker; further lockers may then be adding by constructing the floor, roof, rear wall, door, and just one extra side wall, the existing side wall of the previous locker serving as the other side wall of the new one. The walls, floors, and roof of lockers may be either riveted together (the more traditional method) or, more recently, welded together.
Stepped/2-step lockers are two-tier lockers, usually available only in 15-inch (38-cm.) width; but the compartments and their doors have an L-shaped cross-section, which causes the division between the doors to follow a zigzag pattern. This configuration enables more hanging height to be included in both upper and lower lockers; but part of each compartment (the lower part of the upper one and the upper part of the lower one) will be only half the usual width of two-tier lockers.
The storage lockers were a “pilot,” the kind of small test that city government frequently uses to test a new or controversial idea. The city offered up the lockers for individuals to use for months-long stretches. At the time, city officials warned that “misuse of the lockers, vandalism, or other unanticipated results,” could force them to cancel the project.

Locker

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